Star Wars and F1

Watching my Tivo’d F1 qualifying, and the intro is an amusing compilation of cuts between scenes from the latest Star Wars movie and racers/teams.  Very funny, and a nice way to change up the intro.

A touch later, pics of George Lucas at the Monaco GP qualifying, posing with the crews, etc.  According to the announcers, he’s a big F1 fan.

I suppose it says something about me that I’d rather watch an F1 qualifying than the latest Lucas movie.  Probably nothing good.

The AV Guy at the CME Conference

I always wondered what they got out of the CME conferences: insight from the AV Guy: The Vail Trail

You spend many years of your life going to school and you become a doctor. Since medicine is an ever-evolving field, the stuff you spent the prime of your life studying about soon becomes a bit outdated. So you have to go to these meetings every so often to get caught up on all the new-fangled advancements.

This is where I come in. See, I spent the prime of my life finding new ways to induce the phenomenon commonly known as the ?head rush.? Meaning that I?m also attending these medical meetings, but I?m all the way in the back of the room, working as the AV Guy.

Before you write this off as some geek who doesn’t know anything but AV gear, read the article.  This guy could be writing for The Onion.

via Daily Capsules

Coalition and Center for Ethical Medical Testimony

I didn’t even know this existed: Coalition and Center for Ethical Medical Testimony.

The Coalition and Center for Ethical Medical Testimony is a nonprofit professional membership association dedicated to ensuring that all testimony offered by those designated as medical experts is truthful, and that expert witnesses conduct themselves in accordance with principles of ethics of their profession.

It’s a good idea, and their Statement of Direction is a model for ethical testimony.

Technorati Search on TypePad

I’ve made a minor change to the left sidebar: Google site search out, Technorati site search in.  Why?  Google site search has never been useful, and the Technorati works very well!  I use two searches to see if a search engine can ‘see’ deep in the blog, C-130 and AMA.  Though Technorati isn’t perfect, at least it finds most of those entries, Google didn’t find any of them.

Note to TypePad users: when adding this to your sidebar, lose the <fieldset> tags and use your own CSS tags, otherwise you’ll have trouble controlling the width.  YMMV, etc.

Now, if the TypePad folks would add the (very excellent) MT search as a built-in TypePad feature I’d have nothing to gripe about, at least for a while.

Former Firefighter/Paramedic Turns SWAT Team Doctor in Dallas

A topic I’m very interested in is Tactical medicine, and here’s a trauma surgeon putting it to work:  Former Firefighter/Paramedic Turns SWAT Team Doctor in Dallas

Dallas SWAT officers are now more likely to survive an injury thanks to emergency medical support from a full time, tactically trained trauma surgeon.

Some other SWAT teams around the country are served by doctors on a volunteer or part time basis, but Dallas officials know of no other major city that has a doctor dedicated to the team full time.

"I’m the first physician who’s every day job is to be on a major metropolitan SWAT team," said Dr. Alex Eastman. He’s on call 24 hours a day and deploys alongside SWAT officers in order to provide immediate, comprehensive medical care at the scene of an emergency. He said he has the same training as the rest of the team.

"It’s just that my job is not to go out there and be a police officer. My job is to go out there and take care of these guys," he said.

I did a senior resident project on this topic and think it would have yielded major dividends in some of the ‘active shooter’ mass casualties, like Columbine.

I have other thoughts on this, and I’ll get ot them soon.

Backseaters: Buckle Up!

From DeRidder Beauregard Daily News:

Passengers in the rear seats of vehicles who do not buckle up pose increased risks to themselves and to drivers, according to a recent medical study.

According to a recent issue of the medical journal Academic Emergency Medicine, a driver in a serious, head-on crash is more than twice as likely to be killed if a passenger sitting directly behind him is not wearing a seat belt. A separate 2004 study by the American Medical Association estimates that one in six crash deaths of drivers or front-seat passengers could be prevented if passengers in the back seat were buckled up.

Okay, folks, there it is.  Everyone in the vehicle needs to be belted, and not just for you, but for your fellow vehicle occupants.

The Sonic Flashlight

Expect to see these in your ED within a couple of years: Real Time Tomographic Reflection – RTTR – The Sonic Flashlight.

Basically, they’ve made sono-guided vein cannulation much much easier.  Instead of having to look up at a screen to see what you’re doing, there’s a ‘virtual’ projection right onto the patient, exactly where the operator would like to be concentrating.

Price it right, and they will come.

via MedGadget

Blogborygmi and his Fellow Travellers

Nick brought home a really weird gift on his way back from Greece: A terrorist!  (Er, ‘alleged terrorist’).  He tells it better: Blogborygmi.

Stupidity or Sabotage? The AMA lets us guess!

Alerted by both KevinMD and medGadget, I have some thoughts on the pending closure of the amednews.com‘s online news to AMA members only.

For those of you not familiar with amednews.com, it is "The Newspaper for America’s Physicians".  Well, I suppose it used to be, but in June they’ll flip the virtual switch and be available only to AMA members (or anyone willing to pay a subscription fee).  Thus, it’s not then ‘for America’s Physicians’, it’s ‘another member benefit’.  That I think this is yet another giant step backward for the AMA is a given (I’ve written about my relationship with the AMA before).

Recently I read somewhere that when you see bad management on a scale that challenges credulity, you have to seriously consider sabotage as a motive.  I haven’t ruled that out.

amednews.com certainly has the right to close their site to AMA members / paid subscribers only, but I think they’re missing the biggest benefit of their online news service: making the AMA relevant to the huge numbers of doctors who aren’t AMA members.  They should be considering this, at minimum, a strong PR effort for the AMA to disaffected docs, which might pay dividends in increased membership.  (The alternative isn’t going to happen: nobody is going to join the AMA ($450/yr) to read amed news).

So, another degree of separation between AMA members and the other half of the doctors in the US.  Advocacy groups are supposed to expand their membership base to include all they advocate for, not make an echo chamber of a club.  It’s too bad, and ultimately it’ll be their (the AMA’s) loss.
 

Linksys Geekery

You may safely skip this post.  It concerns tweaking your Linksys wireless router, and it has been quite fun for me.

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MedBlogs Grand Rounds XXXIV

MedBlogs Grand Rounds this week at Galen’s Log.

Welcome to the 34th installment of Grand Rounds.  Ready for your weekly tour of the medical blogosphere?  Lots to see and do this week, so let’s get moving.

First day at Blogger General Hospital, eh?  Let me show you around.  First stop, the Doctor’s Lounge.  Never mind the wounded, M & M conference was this morning.

TPA for CVA comments; also Grand Rounds reminder

In case you’ve missed it, there’s been a pretty good bit of commentary in the TPA for Ischemic CVA post which I initially posted as a fisking of a bad WSJ article on TPA for stroke, but have at least one ?neurologist? commenting on the subject.  I’ve enjoyed the reading.

Also, Medblogs Grand Rounds at Galen’s Log tomorrow, so get your posts in now.

Never Tussel with a Train

Trainknee You won’t win.

Birthday

I am, today, twice the age I ever thought I’d be.

42, for those keeping score at home.

Blogging suspended for today, in celebration.

Celebrate yourselves, in your own way.

My personality

My wife just analyzed my personality:

"You’re a people person, but in short spurts."

Perfect for an ER doc.