Change of Shift 1:10 is up

Welcome one and all the the latest edition of the Change of Shift, the Blog Carnival of Nursing!

There’s something about this post

…that keeps my attention: NHS Blog Doctor: Persecuting junior doctors

The excellent writing, of course.

Project Valour-IT

Project Valour-IT is an effort organized through Soldiers’ Angels.  Their mission with Project Valour-IT is:

Project Valour-IT, in memory of SFC William V. Ziegenfuss, provides voice-controlled laptop computers to wounded Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines recovering from hand and arm injuries or amputations at home or in military hospitals. Operating laptops by speaking into a microphone, our wounded heroes are able to send and receive messages from friends and loved ones, surf the ‘Net, and communicate with buddies still in the field without having to press a key or move a mouse..

The background of the story is humbling, and I’ve given a donation to the Marine Team (yeah, I was a squid, but 80% of my time was on the Green side, and I identify with the Marines more).

There’s a competition of sorts, and the four services are shown here.

Where would your money go?

Every cent raised for Project Valour-IT goes directly to the purchase and shipment of voice-activated laptops for wounded servicemembers. As of October 2006, Valour-IT has distributed nearly 600 laptops to severely wounded Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines across the country.

And, if you know of a servicemember who was wounded and could use one of the voice-controlled laptops:

Wounded military personnel can request a laptop through the sign-up form if they are recovering at home or in military hospitals, or through the Valour-IT/Soldiers’ Angels representatives…

And there’s a list of Military Medical Centers with reps there.  

 

I’ve joined the Marine Team, and it’ll stay on the right sidebar until the Project / competition ends.

 

Got a buck to spare?

Offer: Join the Army (Reserve) of One

I got a phone message the other day, and today I got around to returning it.

 

“You are an ER Doctor, correct?” was the question.  Yep.

“As you may know, we’re experiencing a critical shortage of Emergency Physicians in the Army Reserve, and I’ve been commissioned to contact as many Emergency Physicians as I can to offer them information about the Army Reserve.  Are you interested?”.  Nope.  (I was nicer than that, but that was the gist of it).

 

I’m wondering how they got my number; since they called the work number, I’m guessing they got hold of an ACEP directory.