Shoes

In my practice of Emergency Medicine I see a lot of people, and consequently a lot of feet.  Some people bring me their feet as their problem, and that’s what I’m there for.  No biggie.

Some are reticent to remove their shoes: these are the ones that have foot problems, usually amazingly advanced cases of foot fungus.  This isn’t surprising given our societies’ wearing plastic shoes (sneakers) that don’t / won’t breathe.  So, I’ll spend no small amount of time explaining how the problem begins with warm, dark and wet, and how getting the feet out of the shoes was the best thing to do.  Then, it never ceases to amaze me that people I’ve just spent significant time discussing the need to dry out their feet and get them out of their shoes are the ones who are back in them the second I leave the room.  I hope beyond hope they go home and air the dogs out, and that they go and get some shoes that’ll breathe.

Additionally, I’ve stopped wearing shoe covers during my shifts.  Though I wear mesh-topped shoes, I noted my own feet needed some ‘airing out’, and have changed my ways.  I now wear them when I suspect I’ll need them, but not just because I’m at work.

MedBlogs Grand Rounds 3:35

? grand rounds. Emergency Department

For this weeks Grand Rounds I threw down a challenge for writers to submit a post that they were particularly proud of. As you will soon see, there are some truly gifted writers amongst us; recording the narrative of their experiences as they bump up against the medical humanity.
Each link is followed by a brief preface by its author. ( And in Grunt Docs case, I’m talking brevity approaching singularity!)

Do not rush these readings. They are in no particular order. But it is my careful consideration that each and every one has its own particular elegance well worthy of your time. Enjoy.

Hmm, had I known, I’d have been more verbose if not more eloquent.