The Family I didn’t think existed

I take care of a of of patients with dialysis.  Certainly not all of them, and not even a big percentage of the ones in my county a year, but I do see one to several per shift.  I see dialysis patients, I mean.

I see their families, too.  They’re people, in that they run the gamut from normal to abby, from pleasant to un, from selfless to ish.

The other day I had diagnosed a patient with xxx, and offered an MRI of the same problem, mostly to facilitate the patients’ and consultants’ interaction.

“Oh, we have to get to our evening dialysis appointment” says family member, quickly echoed by the patient.

What?  You’d rather o to dialysis than get the MRI (which is amazingly insightful and probably borne of experience, but I’m not certain.  At any rate I’m not going to argue against it).

“Okay!” says a stunned me.

People who want to get to dialysis.  Sometimes in the ED we wonder if they exist.  They do.

Prologue « Ten out of Ten

Prologue « Ten out of Ten
…So I’ve come a long way, surviving this adolescent growth spurt, with most of my teen angst now behind me. But it’s funny how life works, just as you find one career obstacle safely in your rearview mirror, another one pops up unexpectedly in front of you. And once again I found myself in unfamiliar territory, flying by the seat of my pants, trying to make the right decisions. It’s a long story that I’ll break up over a series of upcoming posts.

Start here, and read the follow-ons.  It’s The Nightmare for independent EM groups.