Archives for June 2009

Radical Moderation | Removing politics from healthcare

Radical Moderation | Removing politics from healthcare

A nice rant in favor of all of us doing something. The Devil remains the Details….

OPFOR: Hero of the Day: R.Lee Ermey

OPFOR: Hero of the Day: R.Lee Ermey

Ooh rah, Gunny.

via Ace

A.M.A. Opposes Government-Sponsored Health Plan – NYTimes.com

A.M.A. Opposes Government-Sponsored Health Plan – NYTimes.com

Wow. I really didn’t see that coming. I may have to hold my nose and join the AMA…

Musings of a Dinosaur: Resident Work Hour Restrictions: My Solution

Musings of a Dinosaur: Resident Work Hour Restrictions: My Solution
I trained back in the dark ages, befitting a dinosaur, when there were no restrictions on the hours worked by resident physicians in training.

I think his answer has merit. I cringe at the experience awaiting residents as they get out to the Real World. I don’t think it’s got a chance in heck of being adopted, but it’s a good idea.

(A different) Dr. RW on Hugh Hewitt’s blog: Townhall.com::Blog

Townhall.com::Blog
We are simply heading for a healthcare disaster an a scale that you have never seen and at a cost you would never dream.

Read it all.

ED Crowding means worse outcomes for chest pain patients?

The article isn’t available yet.  Here’s the pre-publication take from Medwire news:

Crowded emergency departments pose increased risk for chest pain patients

By Mark Cowen

05 June 2009

Acad Emerg Med 2009: Not yet available online

MedWire News: Heart attack patients and those with other forms of chest pain are significantly more likely to experience serious complications after admission to hospital if they were initially treated in a crowded emergency department, US research shows.

“What shocked us is that these complications were not explained by what goes on in the emergency department,” said lead researcher Dr Jesse Pines, from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. “The adverse events occurred after the patient had been admitted to the hospital. Emergency department crowding is really more of a marker of a dysfunctional hospital.”

Hmm.  Delays are delays, but I’ll wait until I see the actual article to comment more.  My first question: are these different hospitals, or same ED with different censuses (which would be a better apple to apple comparison).

Don’t change where you go just yet.

Hmm, those sure do go up a little high…

From Amazon today…

pelican_yuk

KeithHennessey.com » Understanding the Kennedy health care bill

The author was a Policy person in the Bush 43 White House, so you know the angle in the analysis:

KeithHennessey.com » Understanding the Kennedy health care bill
As the committee staff emphasized to the press after the leak, this is an interim draft. I assume things will move around over the next several weeks as discussions among Senators and their staffs continue. This is therefore far from a final product, but it provides a useful insight into current thinking among some key Senate Democrats.

Here are 15 things to know about the draft Kennedy-Dodd health bill.

I read his analysis, and no I didn’t read the full bill. It’s a starting point for the conversation, not the end.

via Ace

A Happy Hospitalist: It’s Time To Gut The Education Process

A Happy Hospitalist: It’s Time To Gut The Education Process

This is quite a good idea. Whether it’d have any effect on specialist pay is a different question.

On Pseudonymity – Transterrestrial Musings

On Pseudonymity – Transterrestrial Musings
I would also say that I agree that there is an important distinction between pseudonymous and anonymous blogging. The former establishes an identity and a reputation that must be both established, and upheld.

While a lot of people know who I am in reality, I still like the pseudonymous blog persona. I think if you’re trying to sell something, or want to be a consultant (same thing, really…) having your name right out there in front is probably the way to go. I have nothing to sell (except ad space, and I’ve been quite a failure at that).

I still personally encourage people new to blogging to do it under a Pen Name, because everything on the internet is now archived forever, or until the power goes out. If you like it and your mom thinks you’re good at it, announce your presence! Be bold!

Just don’t think you can be bold because you’re anonymous. You’re not. (Neither am I, but this is not a call for an outing…).

Backpacker Blogs – Hallelujah: Beer Hydrates Better Than Water

Backpacker Blogs – Hallelujah: Beer Hydrates Better Than Water
Our pal Science now says that beer, yes beer, is more effective for rehydrating the body than plain ol’ water. I think I’m not alone when I say that this qualifies as news on par with peace in the Middle East…

Say Hallelujah.

via HotAir

Dynamist Blog: Medicare First!

Dynamist Blog: Medicare First!

Exactly right. Hey, I’ve said the same thing (though much less well).

Movin’ Meat: Health Wonk Wrap-up: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Movin’ Meat: Health Wonk Wrap-up: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Shadowfax is beginning to see the light at the end of the tunnel really is a train. Better late than never.

Washington Adventure day 3

The sirens never stop here.

Today we had a series of lectures, ranging from the mildly to hyper liberal about healthcare policy, lobbying and reform. Interesting insight, and they’re all pretty sure heath care reform will pass, in some form. (Which is really really hopeful since there’s not even a framework bill out there to start with).

All we heard from are heartened that the big players that helped torpedo HC reform in the Clinton years are currently sitting at the table. They’re well aware that if too big a chunk is taken out of any of the players they can very quickly switch from participant to opponent.

I’m learning a lot about the process, and look forward to tomorrows’ talks.

Paging Dr. Flea

The Trial Of A WhiteCoat – Part 1 « WhiteCoat’s Call Room
The Trial Of A WhiteCoat – Part 1

This is the first in a series of posts I’m going to do about my malpractice trial.
Names and minor facts about the patient and his family have been changed.
Everything else is the real deal.

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Am I wrong to want an intervention here? Okay, it’s his career, but, for the Love of God man, stop. Tell us all about it after it’s over.