All Work and No Play

has made my blog barren, joyless, and, well, dull.

It seems I’ve been working nonstop, and when I’ve had time to myself it’s been consumed with plans for my yearly MegaParty for our Scribes. It’ll be a good one (Seventh, for you counters). (Unless you’ve gotten an invitation, you’re welcome to throw your own party).

Work has drama, but it’s micro-political and therefore sounds whiny when I type it out. I’ll spare you. You’re welcome.

Our joint has started being very aggressive about Induced Hypothermia in resuscitated arrests, and I contributed to a success story, something that’s rare in medicine: a resuscitated arrest that left the hospital neurologically intact 1 week later. Anecdotal, I know, but still. I don’t know if I’ve had one of these before. I hope it’s a trend.

As for shootin’ stuff, I’ve had a self-imposed restriction on adding any new calibers of firearms, as at a certain point keeping up with all the different ammo types can be daunting, and expensive. That took care of itself recently when I was shooting my new 357Sig rounds through my Sigs with Barsto barrels (which I had just dropped in, and not had fitted by a gunsmith). I got talked into 357Sig rather than choosing it, but thought it deserved a good try.

That try had 6 failures to feed in 100 rounds, and said gear has been shelved. As I wasn’t crazy about it to start with the extra effort to make it work was easy to avoid.

Therefore, a new caliber opened up. I’ve never owned a .45, and that’ll change soon. I have my eye on the Springfield XD in 45, I’ve shot the range loaner and found it surprisingly likable and well-fitting for a non-Sig pistol (I’m mostly a Sig pistol snob), so different experiences pay off.

For those screaming at their screens that I need to get a 1911-style 45, rest assured I’ve shot several of them over the years, shot one recently, and, eh. I can shoot it, don’t like it, and you may now call me a Philistine.

Tomorrow I get to take another shooting-newbie out and teach him from zero, an experience I relish. So, good. Some play!

» Features » July 15th: Note 2 Nurse day.

Nurses. Sometimes we are our own worst enemy.

But on July 15th, you have the chance to thank a nurse you admire.

Buy a small card and take a moment to write a message acknowledging their awesomeness.

via » Features » July 15th: Note 2 Nurse day..

Impacted Nurse has a good idea here, a day to send some small token of appreciation to your nurses.

Put it on your calendar, and I’ll do the same.

Happy Independence Day!

7305

Have a safe and Happy July the 4th!

Photo originally used three years ago

Three Days Left: My Medical Museum | Home

UPDATE: Nevermind. see the comments.

We want you to visit your local medical museum, and tell us about it.

Chances are, you live near a medical museum. Maybe it’s an overlooked building downtown, or a hospital library. Inside, you’ll find bizarre specimen, important documents, and yes, medical gadgets.

This contest is an opportunity to showcase your local medical museum’s treasures for the world to see, as well as to describe your local medical history and explain how clinicians and scientists in your area contributed to medicine.

via My Medical Museum | Home.

There is time left for you to win an iPad (I bought mine, and really like it).  So, go t your local medical museum, and win!

Advice for aspiring scribes

I’ve written about Scribes before, and I love ‘em all.

I got an interesting email today that got me recommending my usual lament, that scribes “don’t get it” until they get ‘the buffer’, which I described as such:

[T]he one skill that makes a good scribe is a 2 to 3 sentence
brain buffer. That means, the ability to save in your head 2 or 3
whole sentences, then play it back to write down or act on.

Nearly everyone who starts wants to act on the first 6 words, starts
doing, and loses all that follows the first little bit.

So, there’s your key. Watch tv, listen to 3 sentences, mute the tv and
write them out. A little practice goes a long way.

I base this on watching 8 years of scribes train, progress, and move on, and my own personal experience as a medical student.

Repeat yourself enough as a practicing EM doc using scribes, and you notice when scribes ‘get it’, get that ability to hear everything you say and incorporate that into the record.  And it’s the buffer that does it.

When I was in Med School I got that buffer, a life skill that serves me well to this day.  We didn’t have a note service, or copies of the profs’ PowerPoints, we had paper, pens, and what we wrote down from the lecture.  I wrote a lot, and fear of failure will stimulate the brain.

At my MS2 peak I had about a 5 sentence buffer, and I and my row-mates would be writing long after the lecture ended.

This ability to hear things and keep them in brain-RAM drove my then-new wife nuts; I could watch TV and ‘hear’ her, but when she would say “You didn’t hear a thing I said, did you…” I could very easily repeat her last sentence or two and answer her question.  I still have some of it, though atrophy hits everything not exercised…

So, learn to listen, not just hear: there’s your key.