Darvocet is banned, Primatene mist still available

FDA is therefore illogical. At best.

Tats and lacs

I like lacs (lacerations).  It’s bread and butter in EM, and it’s a way to demonstrably help a patient immediately and visibly.

Visibly is where the tattoos come in. While I don’t have any skin art, many of my patients do. It’s interesting how many lacerations go through my patients’ tats.

While with the USMC in Okinawa, a patient went through a window. Whether he jumped or was pushed was a point of contention, but that mattered not to me. What did matter was the roughly 2 foot long, razor-straight laceration of an upper-through-to-lower arm, going through an ornate tattoo.

Due to the natural stretch of skin (Langhers’ lines) when skin is cut it doesn’t fall one side to another like a steak, but will ‘spring’ into different directions…. which makes deciding what to tie to what a little complicated.

Unless there’s a picture embedded into the skin. Then, it’s a relatively easy ‘connect the dots’, putting the picture back together.

I spent the better part of a couple of hours doing my best, and in the end even the patient was happy with the result. He did say that he’d get it touched up after it healed… (Someone educate me here, how do scars take tattoo dye)?

Yes, lacs happen, and we try to make the resulting closure first functional and then as cosmetic as we can. The tats make it a lot more interesting.