Carl McCoy: Dear Grads, Don’t ‘Do What You Love’ – WSJ.com

What he said. Even Docs have to come to terms with this.

Does the doctor love going into the hospital to see a patient in the middle of the night? Does the firefighter love entering a burning building? Does the teacher love trying to control a classroom full of disrespectful children? Not likely. But the work is performed with a sense of purpose that "love" doesn’t capture.We don’t all have to become first responders or social workers. And we can’t all find jobs with such obvious benefits to society. When diplomas are being handed out, though, it might be worthwhile for graduates—and the rest of us—if the popular "do what you love" message were balanced with a more timeless message to find work that, even in some small way, truly matters.

via Carl McCoy: Dear Grads, Don't 'Do What You Love' – WSJ.com.

FatBottomed Girls, mens’ chorus version

I like it.

RAND studies the ED, finds we are good.

RAND did us a huge favor here, documenting the shifts in styles of care and validating most of what we’ve said anecdotally.

http://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/research_reports/RR200/RR280/RAND_RR280.pdf

Enjoy!

I turned 50 today

Some reflections on the first third of my life.

I’ve been blessed with people in all stages of my life who supported me, and even when situations didn’t warrant it, they kept believing. My parents are alive and healthy, three terrific kids, two grand kids, a most excellent and accomplished son-in-law (and another in the wings).

Professionally I’m on plane, and keep finding new things to be curious about, and sometimes fix, the lifelong learning continues.

My wife deserves the majority of the credit for survival to this point. She kept me from dying of malnutrition in med school, and refrained from killing me when I gave her the opportunity, and she’s The Best.

So, here’s to more 50 year BDay celebrations!

Our unrealistic attitudes about death, through a doctor’s eyes

We all die. Here’s just a snippet from this doctors’ experience:

…Sometimes an estranged family member is “flying in next week to get all this straightened out.” This is usually the person who knows the least about her struggling parent’s health; she’ll have problems bringing her white horse as carry-on luggage. This person may think she is being driven by compassion, but a good deal of what got her on the plane was the guilt and regret of living far away and having not done any of the heavy lifting in caring for her parent.

via Washington Post.

I’ve seen this many, many times in my ED; the child of the nearly-deceased who has been doing all the caring comes in, says essentially ‘let them die comfortably’, then come in the ones who haven’t been doing the work, haven’t seen the daily decline, and they browbeat the first into a retreat. ‘I think I misunderstood, we need to do everything’ they say to me while watching the floor; my job is nothing compared to the needless suffering they’ve consigned their dying parent to experience.

Shame on us for making dying foreign, and not the end of a life well spent.

Zachary Quinto vs. Leonard Nimoy

It’s been a while since I posted something fun:

 

Is farting in the OR transmitting germs?

From the BMJ:

“It all started with an enquiry from a nurse,” Dr Karl Kruszelnicki told listeners to his science phone-in show on the Triple J radio station in Brisbane. “She wanted to know whether she was contaminating the operating theatre she worked in by quietly farting in the sterile environment during operations, and I realised that I didn’t know. But I was determined to find out.”

via Hot air?.

Yes, it’s a 2001 article, but I wasn’t blogging then, so missed it.

Brought to my attention by Glen in West Texas, thanks Glen!

All health-care systems have ‘death panels’ of one sort or another | Full Comment | National Post

Via @medskep on twitter:

Many scoff at the term “death panel” — Sarah Palin’s morbid, if misleading description of the powers contained in U.S. government health-care legislation back in 2009. Yet there was a grain of truth in that infamous noun phrase. The fact of the matter is that all health-care systems have “death panels” of one sort or another. It’s just a question of who sits on them — bureaucrats, insurers or doctors — and what label we put on their functions.

via All health-care systems have ‘death panels’ of one sort or another | Full Comment | National Post.

There’s the truth, let’s not act like it isn’t.

iPhone: turn off Amber Alerts

Yes, I’m a terrible human being. I turned off my Amber alerts.  (You can too).

Here’s the thing: If I were on the road a whole lot, Amber Alerts would be much more relevant: X is missing in Y vehicle from Z town. As I’m nearly always a) asleep or b) in my very remote near hideaway where nothing scary or even interesting happens, it’s literally alarming when these alerts come screaming through my iPhone. Disturbing, actually, in a literal sense. I feel like I should apologize more for this decision, so, I cannot imagine the heartbreak and fear involved in wondering where your child is, and I mean that. I apologize for opting out.

But, it’s the right thing for me, and it might be for you, too.

Here’s how, and it’s brutally simple:

iPhone: Notifications -> Government alerts

iPhone: Notifications -> Government alerts

Just so you know, even if you turn all the Government Alerts off, you’ll still get Presidential Level alerts.

So you know.

 

GruntDoc.com turns 11

11 years of nothingness, punctuated by inanity.

Thanks to my 11 readers. I appreciate nearly all of you.

Here’s to twice the fun for the next 11 years!