A Few Questions for the AMA | The Redheaded Pharmacist

Sing it!

The American Medical Association AMA just concluded their Annual Meeting of the House of Delegates in Chicago on Wednesday, June 19th. And it seems as if the profession of pharmacy was a topic of conversation. According to the AMAWire, one of the points of discussion for the delegates this year was pharmacist inquiries with practitioners to verify controlled substances. This is the statement they released in response that you will find on the AMA’s website: The AMA delegates “Issued a warning against “inappropriate inquiries” from pharmacies to verify the medical rationale behind prescriptions and diagnoses, calling them unwarranted interference with the practice of medicine.” Forgive me for being a bit confused about the last part of that statement. I’ve always been under the impression that the duty of a pharmacist was to ensure prescriptions were written for a legitimate medical condition in the course of a practitioner’s normal scope of practice. If we are being accused of interference, shall we then be relieved of all responsibilities toward ensuring the best interests of our patients? Are we not the drug expert profession that is the last stop in the chain of treatment from provider to the patient?

via A Few Questions for the AMA | The Redheaded Pharmacist.

NEJM on inflight medical emergencies

Via Doximity, a nice review of inflight medical emergencies:

We conducted a study of in-flight medical emergencies involving large commercial airlines, characterizing on-board assistance provided by flight crews and other passengers and identifying the outcomes of these events, including ambulance transport to a hospital and hospital admission. On the basis of our findings, we suggest a practical approach to the initial management of common in-flight medical emergencies for medical personnel who may be called on to render aid.

NEJM

DoD Buzz | Navy Scuttles All-Cap Messages

Way past time…

WE DON’T HAVE TO SEND MESSAGES THIS WAY ANYMORE, the Navy has decided.Word went out from the Navy’s Fleet Cyber Command on May 8 that the Navy’s internal messaging system now had the ability to transmit in lower case as well as the traditional upper case letters.“Therefore, it is not necessary to limit Navy messages entirely to upper case,” said the directive, first reported by the Navy Times.Of course, the message saying that upper case was no longer needed went out this way: “THEREFORE, IT IS NOT NECESSARY TO LIMIT NAVY MESSAGES ENTIRELY TO UPPER CASE.”

via DoD Buzz | Navy Scuttles All-Cap Messages.

I remember reading Navy messages in the 90’s and wondering why they were always all caps. When I asked I got a very Naval ‘because’.

Mr. Balls, aka Senhor Testicle, goes to bat for cancer research  – NY Daily News

Just go look.

At first blush, the mascot’s name is rather endearing: Mr. Balls.But for those who might find that descriptive title offensive, the scrotum-shaped character also answers to "Senhor Testiculo" in Brazil, where he is a spokes-thing for a group that is seeking to raise awareness of testicular cancer research.

via Mr. Balls, aka Senhor Testicle, goes to bat for cancer research  – NY Daily News.

U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies in broad secret program – The Washington Post

Thank goodness my blog’s not on this list!

U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies in broad secret program

via U.S. intelligence mining data from nine U.S. Internet companies in broad secret program – The Washington Post.

Forgive the levity. Privacy, schmivacy. It’s not like the Government will ever use any of this for partisan purposes.

I met several CPR survivors today; I was involved with some of them

At the Fort Worth Municipal building, a gathering of AED/CPR survivors. I was told 10 of them; they came with their families, and there were a lot of lay rescuers and EMS, who as usual deserve the credit for a ‘save’, as if they don’t get the heart restarted in the field there’s not a lot we can do in the ER.

I was also told I was involved in the care of 4 of them. Crazy odds.

Two patients knew of me (probably from billing, frankly, none were awake in the ED), and they were 100% neurologically intact. We had nice chats, and I got my photo with both, but as I didn’t ask their permission to post them, I won’t.

Still, wow.

It’s incredibly humbling to have follow-up on a happy ED case, and when it’s neurologically intact CPR survivors, it’s the equivalent of a Moon shot for an ER guy, and today I got four. Four.

(It’s an occupational hazard in the ED that we meet/greet/diagnose/stabilize and disposition, and what that individual patients’ medical future holds we have no idea unless we go out of our way, and we’re busy enough nobody I know goes out of their way to follow up cases).

I am renewed. I’m not a Pollyanna doc (read the blog), but this has my attention: the practice has changed, and it works.

Hallelujah.