33 Charts — medicine. health. social media.

Well put!

After a recent presentation on social physicians, someone asked why there were so many emergency medicine physicians on blogs and social media?  Good question.  From content to conversation, ER docs are heavily represented in public spaces.  And it’s as much about passion and participation as raw numbers on any given platform.

What is it about emergency medicine physicians that has lead them to flex their muscles and reach out beyond the confines of their emergency centers?

via 33 Charts — medicine. health. social media..

Yrs. Trly. gets a mention.

Google Glass handed out to medical students at UC Irvine – CNET

I have a question.

The fledgling Google Glass is slowly working its way into the mainstream, and one place that people should get used to seeing the device is in hospitals.

Several medical institutions have already been testing the computer-enabled eyeglasses to see if the devices enhance doctors’ work. But the School of Medicine at the University of California, Irvine, is taking it one step further by issuing Google Glass to its students.

Irvine will be the first medical school to fully incorporate Glass into its four-year curriculum. Its first- and second-year students will use the device in their anatomy and clinical skills courses, while third- and fourth-year students will wear Glass during their hospital rotations.

via Google Glass handed out to medical students at UC Irvine – CNET.

Will the students be tested with the same Glass they were allowed to use while studying? I have concerns this would be a four year training session for Glass, not actually learning so they could go without it. (As opposed to their smartphones, I realize).+

All Trials | All Trials Registered. All Results Reported

Many thanks to Steve in the comments on the last post for alerting me to this movement:

It’s time all clinical trial results are reported.

Patients, researchers, pharmacists, doctors and regulators everywhere will benefit from publication of clinical trial results. Wherever you are in the world please sign the petition:

Thousands of clinical trials have not reported their results; some have not even been registered.

Information on what was done and what was found in these trials could be lost forever to doctors and researchers, leading to bad treatment decisions, missed opportunities for good medicine, and trials being repeated.

All trials past and present should be registered, and the full methods and the results reported.

We call on governments, regulators and research bodies to implement measures to achieve this.

via All Trials | All Trials Registered. All Results Reported.

I signed the petition, and hope others will as well.

Realistically, this will require either a mindboggling scandal (even worse than the ones we know about) leading to group self-regulation, or more likely, intrusive and poorly thought out legislation.

I know what I’d bet on.

Facebook Like Now Covered by the First Amendment – Applications for Healthcare | Hospital EMR and EHR

This is at the end of an article talking about something else, but it deserves it own highlight:

My favorite thing is when healthcare organizations try and control and restrict social media. As many institutions have learned, that’s impossible to do. Instead, it’s much more effective to educate and inform people on their use of social media. The best reason you should educate and inform as opposed to control and restrict is the message it sends to your employees. The former sends a message of trust and respect while the later does the opposite.

via Facebook Like Now Covered by the First Amendment – Applications for Healthcare | Hospital EMR and EHR.

Well said.

Jeffrey Singer: The Man Who Was Treated for $17,000 Less – WSJ.com

Medical sticker-shock, and one mans’ remedy.

By JEFFREY A. SINGEREvery so often I have an extraordinary and surprising experience with a patient—the kind that makes us both say, "Wow, we’ve learned something from this." One such moment occurred recently.

via Jeffrey Singer: The Man Who Was Treated for $17,000 Less – WSJ.com.

Rare Diseases Give Jenny McCarthy Life-Time Achievement Award | Medical Satire – GomerBlog

Gomerblog is killing it these days.

LOS ANGELES, CA – Thursday night the 197,788th annual rare-disease awards, formally known as the common disease awards, brought the house down at the Staples Center. 

via Rare Diseases Give Jenny McCarthy Life-Time Achievement Award | Medical Satire – GomerBlog.

What doctors should look for in job seekers’ social media presence – amednews.com

Don’t make yourself unhireable.

As the medical director of a health services group that serves racially diverse patients in some of Chicago’s poorest neighborhoods, Ravi Grivois-Shah, MD, always conducts a quick search of physicians he’s interested in hiring on various social media sites and blogs to see if anything worrisome surfaces before offering them a position.

via What doctors should look for in job seekers’ social media presence – amednews.com.

SoMe is entertaining, but here’s the equation we should all keep in mind: Job >>>>>> SoMe.

You’re welcome.

West Nile virus 2013 as of July 2nd

Last year was a big year for us in Texas with West Nile, an in conversation with colleagues the other day we noted we hadn’t seen any yet.

So, to the CDC Map of cases:
WNV722013map
Wow, Texas is dark green as are several other states! Must be an epidemic, right?

Not so much:
WNVactualcases722013
Two cases made Texas look like ground zero. (This isn’t to make light of the CDC, it’s to point out that maps by state aren’t necessarily as descriptive as they look).

And, I and mine got ambushed by mosquitoes today, so wear the right clothing/DEET, etc. Or the map you change might represent you!

Source: CDC West Nile virus

Is farting in the OR transmitting germs?

From the BMJ:

“It all started with an enquiry from a nurse,” Dr Karl Kruszelnicki told listeners to his science phone-in show on the Triple J radio station in Brisbane. “She wanted to know whether she was contaminating the operating theatre she worked in by quietly farting in the sterile environment during operations, and I realised that I didn’t know. But I was determined to find out.”

via Hot air?.

Yes, it’s a 2001 article, but I wasn’t blogging then, so missed it.

Brought to my attention by Glen in West Texas, thanks Glen!

What to Say to a Friend Who’s Ill – WSJ.com

Well done.

‘A closed mouth gathers no feet.” It’s a charming axiom, but silence isn’t always an option when we’re dealing with a friend who’s sick or in despair. The natural human reaction is to feel awkward and upset in the face of illness, but unless we control those feelings and come up with an appropriate response, there’s a good chance that we’ll blurt out some cringe-worthy cliché, craven remark or blunt question that, in retrospect, we’ll regret.
via What to Say to a Friend Who’s Ill – WSJ.com.

Physicians: Don’t take UAE jobs

Via @Skepticscalpel on Twitter:

JOHANNESBURG — For Dr. Cyril Karabus, it was a routine job, albeit in an exotic location. For six weeks in 2002, he filled in for another doctor in Abu Dhabi, lured like many other foreign professionals by the big paychecks that doctors, bankers, lawyers and architects can earn in the United Arab Emirates and other Persian Gulf nations.

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A decade later, while Dr. Karabus was passing through Dubai on his way home to South Africa after attending his son’s wedding in Canada, officials abruptly arrested him, calling him a murderer and hauling him away from his stunned wife.

via United Arab Emirates’ Laws Ensnare a Doctor – NYTimes.com.

Just say no. Australia and NZ are supposed to be nice, civilized places to practice.

How Doctors Die | The Saturday Evening Post

Well written, and I think correct.

It’s not a frequent topic of discussion, but doctors die, too. And they don’t die like the rest of us. What’s unusual about them is not how much treatment they get compared to most Americans, but how little. For all the time they spend fending off the deaths of others, they tend to be fairly serene when faced with death themselves. They know exactly what is going to happen, they know the choices, and they generally have access to any sort of medical care they could want. But they go gently.

via How Doctors Die | The Saturday Evening Post.

 

Some studies that I like to quote

Wow! Very nice.

BS Study*: Doctors Feel Patients’ Pain | Empathy | LiveScience

Been a while since I pulled out the BS flag, and this seems entirely appropriate:

Good doctors really do feel their patients’ pain.

Hmm. ‘Good’ doctors?

A study, published today (Jan. 29) in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, shows that when doctors see their patients experiencing pain, the pain centers in the physicians’ own brains light up. And when the doctors give treatment to relieve pain, it activates the physicians’ reward centers.

The doctors were then instructed either to use an electronic device that they believed would relieve the patients’ pain, or to withhold the pain relief. In response, the patient-actors either grimaced in pain or maintained a neutral expression to suggest their pain had subsided.

via Doctors Feel Patients’ Pain | Empathy | LiveScience.

Umm, what? These ‘good’ doctors were told that an electronic device would either relieve or not relieve pain, and then they reacted to their patients’ acting with activity in their own pain or reward centers by fMRI.

My first question: did these docs really buy into this magical electronic pain-relieving device, and if so, why? I have to wonder if it was their amusement areas lighting up and not their pleasure centers…

Second, at no time is ‘good’ established in this article. Were there a subset of docs whose fMRI’s didn’t change, and thus they’re ‘bad’?

Not buying it (would buy one of those magical electronic pain relievers, though).

 

*I say this is a BS study based on this writeup. If it’s something else entirely, okay, but this is just awful.

CDC – Seasonal Influenza (Flu) – Situation Update: Summary of Weekly FluView

Go get your flu shot, it looks like they hit it on the head (which is remarkable, at least to me). Picking the right antigens is always tricky.

From the CDC:

  • Since October 1, 2012, CDC has antigenically characterized 140 influenza viruses, including two 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses, 90 influenza A (H3N2) viruses and 48 influenza B viruses.
  • The 2009 influenza A (H1N1) viruses were characterized as A/California/7/2009-like. This is the influenza A (H1N1) component of the Northern Hemisphere vaccine for the 2012-2013 season.
  • All 90 of the influenza A (H3N2) viruses were characterized as A/Victoria/361/2011-like. This is the influenza A (H3N2) component of the Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine for the 2012-2013 season.
  • Approximately 71% of the 48 influenza B viruses belonged to the B/Yamagata lineage of viruses, and were characterized as B/Wisconsin/1/2010-like, the influenza B component for the 2012-2013 Northern Hemisphere influenza vaccine.
  • The remaining 29% of the tested influenza B viruses belonged to the B/Victoria lineage of viruses.
  • Since October 1, 2012, CDC has tested two 2009 influenza A (H1N1), 122 influenza A (H3N2), and 81 influenza B virus isolates for resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors this season. Each of the viruses showed susceptibility to the antiviral drugs oseltamivir and zanamivir. High levels of resistance to the adamantanes (amantadine and rimantadine) persist among 2009 influenza A (H1N1) and A (H3N2) viruses. (Adamantanes are not effective against influenza B viruses.)

So, Tamiflu should help (some).